Literary Events: Dead in Dun Laoghaire

 

Paula Hawkins reading from her second novel, Into the Water

\Dead in Dun Laoghaire is a brand spanking new, one-day festival run by Penguin Randomhouse in partnership with The Irish Times. As you’ve probably guessed, the festival is held in Dun Laoghaire, which is a lively, seaside town. And in case you haven’t guessed, it’s a crime fiction festival. Nobody died at this event.

The festival took place in the lovely Pavillion Theatre and it was €40 for a full-day ticket. Dun Laoghaire is quite a drive from my house so I took advantage of the good value and attended all four events.

For a new festival they managed to assemble an incredibly impressive lineup of guests: Paula Hawkins, Kathy Reichs, John Banville, Stuart Neville, Liz Nugent and Karen Perry. All very commercially successful, as well as being extremely good at what they do, but then I suppose with backers as high-profile as they had, maybe it isn’t so surprising. The interviewers were all professional journalists, and so the questions asked were very interesting and incisive.

Overall the festival was very well-run. The venue is modern, clean and the auditorium is well-designed with great views of the stage. For two events I sat at the back and in the far corner, and at all times I could see and hear everything as though I was in the front. There were brilliant goodie-bags with BOOKS in them.

Goodie-bags with BOOKS!

The book-signings were well-organised and the staff were polite and helpful. The events started on time and were spaced nicely for breaks between events. I took advantage of the breaks to spend a fortune in the Dubrays’ bookstall outside the theatre. I can’t wait to get stuck into my purchases.

Paula Hawkins gave a fascinating and candid interview. She spoke about the ‘dreaded second novel’, and how difficult she found it in comparison to her first. She also spoke about how The Girl on the Train evolved from a different story and a character that kept hanging around in her head. Just to show that from small acorns big trees grow, and that if a character won’t quit, it’s usually for a reason.

I love hearing how writers start out their careers, it always reminds me that we come from all walks of life, all backgrounds, and for 90% of us, it wasn’t our first ‘proper job’. She started out as a journalist and was eventually commissioned to write a few romance novels under a pseudonym. These novels were fairly successful and sold well.  She spoke about how those novels began to slowly creep into thriller territory, and that each of them has ‘dark elements’ to them, which was an early indication of her true calling.

She is proud of those early novels, as she learned about the craft of novel writing through writing them. I found this a really interesting point, in that when we start out it is all trial and error as we find our voice, learn the craft, find out what works and what doesn’t. It is interesting that one of the most successful thriller writers of this decade started out writing romance.

John Banville and Stuart Neville spoke about their experiences of writing under pseudonyms. Neville, who writes under the pseudonym Haylen Beck, talked about how working-class children aren’t encouraged into the arts. I’d agree with him on that. He also spoke about his experience of writer’s block, and how the problem shouldn’t be so easily dismissed.

I was very interested to hear from Liz Nugent, having seen her MC at an event earlier in the year, where she spoke very little about herself. I’ve read Unravelling Oliver and really enjoyed it. It was nice to hear from a local writer, close enough to my age, and a woman. She has also broken America, which is very exciting, and she told us about the edits she had to make to make her novel understandable to the American audience.

Karen Perry and Liz Nugent

Karen Perry is actually a pseudonym. They are a team of two writers, Paul Perry, a poet, and Karen Gillece, an author, who write collaboratively. They detailed how they go about writing their novels together, and how they tackle the female and male characters separately. They each write a chapter of the book and pass it back to the other writer like a baton, so that they can progress the plot. I have to admit to having some envy at the way they work. It must be great to be constantly getting feedback on your work from someone you trust and who is as invested in the outcome as you are. I’ve just finished Girl Unknown, which had me on the edge of my seat, and I’m looking forward to reading their next novel.

Given that I’d bought the group ticket for the event, I stayed on for the final event, a chat with Kathy Reichs. I hadn’t read any of her work beforehand, but I knew she was very popular, so I thought I might learn something. The organisers gave us a free brandy cocktail before we went in. It blew the head off me, but it was exactly what I needed after a day’s active listening.

Popular is an understatement. Kathy Reichs spoke to a full house and it isn’t surprising. Wow, this woman is fascinating and very witty. I didn’t think I’d have the energy to be riveted so late in the evening, but she held my attention from the moment she opened her mouth. If you hadn’t guessed by my nickname, Cathy DayDream, my attention-span isn’t the best.

Reichs is a doctor in forensic anthropology, and explained exactly what that was and how she ended up writing fiction. While working in a university, a fellow professor confided that she was writing to supplement her income. Reichs decided to do the same. The rest, is history. She is now a prolific author of wildly successful crime fiction, and a screenwriter on Bones. This is on top of her work as a forensic anthropologist. She is a busy woman!

She spoke a lot about her work as an anthropologist, both as an academic, and someone whose expertise is called upon in practical ways. She is sometimes asked to assist in the identification of bodies, where alternative methods of identification won’t work. Everyone can draw inspiration from their workplace, no matter how mundane they might think it is. If you’re going to pick a job that gives you the material for novel-writing, I don’t think you can go far wrong with forensic anthropology, difficult as it would be to the majority of us.

She has co-authored young-adult novels with her son. Interestingly, her daughter is abandoning Law to become a writer- which makes me feel better about my decision! I bought Reich’s most recent book, and I’m really looking forward to reading it.

Overall, Dead in Dun Laoighre was a brilliant festival, and I’ll definitely be back next year.

Do you attend literary festivals? What is the best author interview you’ve seen? Whats the best tip you’ve cleaned from an author at a literary festivals? What is your favourite festival?

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CatherineEDay

My name is Catherine Day. After practising law for many years, I’ve decided to take the leap, leave law temporarily, and write the novel I’ve always wanted to write.

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