Writer’s Tools: The Coded Kind

The writer’s toolbox is something that is much referred to in Stephen King’s, On Writing. The writer’s metaphorical toolbox is filled with a knowledge of grammar, punctuation, syntax, vocabulary etc. But what if there was another kind of toolbox? One filled with programs that can help you get your novel written, or edited? Or even help you sharpen the contents of the toolbox in your brain?

Here are my top writer’s tools of the coded variety:

FOR REMEMBERING: zoho notebook app

Inspiration can come at the most unexpected times. It’s a disaster if you don’t catch an idea before another thought jumps into your brain. Never forget/mislay a good idea again by installing a notebook app on your phone.

My mobile came with a basic one preloaded and it was grand for a while, but I found that over time my writing-related notes ended up lost among to-do lists and shopping lists. There are hundreds of notebook apps available but I opted for Zoho’s Notebook app. The app is compatible with Android and iPhone and is an intuitive and aesthetically beautiful thing.

You can store writing, PDF documents, images and audio in individual notebooks. Multiple notebooks can be opened up so that you can assign a notebook to each project. In the screenshot above, you can see that I have a notebook for my novel, a notebook for my blog etc.

Although it wasn’t specifically designed just for writers, it feels like it was, with inspirational quotes (mainly from authors) popping up every time you open a new notebook. And I know you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but just look at those notebook covers? Look at them! Beautiful. They could only ever contain worthwhile things.

For vocabulary: wordnik

I love my thesaurus and dictionary, but even though I have my physical books right beside me on my desk, I rarely use them. More often than not I end up using online versions. It’s just quicker. Wordnik brings a number of trusted online dictionary and thesaurus entries together. In terms of its role as a synonym generator, I prefer it to a standard one. It’s so extensive that it will make some more obscure/tenuous suggestions, but that makes it a little edgier than your average thesaurus.

FOR WRITING: SCRIVENER

I was amazed to attend my writer’s group and learn that many of them hadn’t heard of Scrivener. I sent them to read my blog post and so that’s where I’m sending you. Read all about it, here.

FOR SYNTAX & CULLING zombie WORDS: HEMINGWAY

When I got to the final draft of my novel, Hemingway was a lifesaver. It identified stylistic offences that verge on the criminal in modern writing. It highlighted the use of the passive voice, adverbs, weak verbs and lengthy sentences. Trust me, by the time you reach your final draft you won’t have the energy to go looking for these things to weed them out. Do yourself a favour, save yourself the time and heartache and get the Hemingway app, here.

FOR GRAMMAR, TYPOS, AND PUNCTUATION: Grammarly

Grammarly identifies misspelled words, grammatical mistakes, and mistakes in punctuation. When suggesting that a word is misspelled, it checks for context, which is really clever. The app works across the web, meaning that it’ll also flag up errors in your social media posts and blog posts.

Is the app making me lazy or complacent? No. In fact, Grammarly is making me a better writer. I’m a person that learns best by doing. For example, I read a book on punctuation to improve my difficult relationship with commas. It was a painful read, but I managed to wade through it. When I’d finished, I put it down and promptly forgot 99% of the rules listed. This is why I love Grammarly. Each highlighted error comes with an explanation as to why it has been identified as a mistake, and I’m instinctively making fewer errors. I’m being conditioned to write better.

If you use the basic Grammarly plus Hemingway you should catch MOST serious errors for free.

Get Grammarly, here.

to avoid distractions:Freedom app

The internet is by far the biggest distraction for most writers. The momentum of the first draft kept me away from the internet, but I found that going into the second draft a few bad habits began to creep in. I ended up downloading this app. I highly recommend it. The app blocks listed sites at specific times/for specific durations on multiple devices. Simple, but effective. Your productivity will increase significantly. Get the Freedom App here.

to tap into the musical muse: spotify

Some people detest any kind of music when they write, but many more of us love a bit of musak! Spotify recommends music to the user depending on their taste, and there’s no limit to the amount of music you can download. I’ve created a number of playlists for writing. A general one, a playlist for tension, love/sex, violent scenes, fear, fun and sadness. All are available here.

To cure writer’s block: writing prompts

There are loads of wonderful ways a person can unclog a word blockage, but if they don’t work, there are websites and apps for that. I’ve listed the best online/ appy writing prompts on a separate post, because there are too many to list here. They are all unique, and great in their own special way. Click here to have a look at the best of them.

What apps/programs/websites do you recommend to aspiring authors and why?