Discovering Podcasts

For a long time, I didn’t understand the allure of the podcast for aspiring writers. I didn’t understand the point in listening to advice on writing as opposed to reading it. It felt a bit like cheating on the written word to me, but I’ve since learned that I’ve been seriously missing out on some great entertainment with a side-order of excellent fiction-writing advice. And all of it is free of charge.

As with most things, with the exception of learning how to base jump from the roof of a very tall skyscraper, writing is learned best by just throwing yourself into it. Doing it, doing it badly and then redoing it. Because, unlike a misjudgment made whilst freefalling from a tall building, the mess can be fixed with a discerning eye and a delete button. But there are nuggets of advice-gold to be found in them thar podcasts, but something else too. Something just as precious. Writers are a sharey bunch, and they are sharing their experiences of writing with you. Their ups, their downs, their highs, their lows. Many of them will resonate, and it makes you feel a little less alone in your writing bubble. And all of these people came out the other side with a finished story. That’s reassuring. Not as reassuring as a safety net might be for that reckless base-jumper, but reassuring nonetheless.

So I listened and I listened, and I really enjoyed myself. And then it came to writing a post about all the podcasts that I loved and I couldn’t because there were too many. So I’ve decided to write a few posts, concentrating on the various categories of podcast aimed at writers, and though many of them overlap to some extent in their content, I’m going to categorise them based on what the majority of their podcast episodes deal with:

1. Advice:

These podcasts might deal with the craft of storytelling, or they might deal with the nuts and bolts of grammar or punctuation. It is often solid, tried and tested advice mixed with the experiences of the host/guests in terms of what works for them.

2. Inspirational podcasts:

These deal with the creative side of writing.

3. Business podcasts:

These involve discussion around the business of writing, such as marketing and platform-building. These are very important, as all writers must know how to build their audience, regardless of whether they are published or self-published. I include ‘techy’ podcasts in relation to marketing in this category.

4. Interviews with Authors:

Authors will often read from their book and talk about how their novel came to fruition. Though these aren’t specifically ‘advice’ podcasts, it is always interesting to hear about the processes of other writers. You might learn something.

5. Book review podcasts:

Though these podcasts aren’t specifically aimed at writers, there are two reasons that a writer might want to listen to a podcast like this. Firstly, it is really important that a writer learns how to dissect a novel and analyse its composition. What works, what doesn’t. Listening to a book reviewer will help you to develop those critical thinkings skills. It also reminds you that you have an audience to cater to, and what kinds of things might they say about your novel if they were reviewing it.

Over the next few weeks, I’ll be putting together posts on specific categories of podcasts, and picking the best from each bunch. Let me know in the comments if you have any favourites you want me to take a look at.